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Monday, January 29, 2007

NEWS EVENTS OFTEN SHAPED BY "THE HUMAN FACTOR" -- LA POLITICA Y EL FACTOR HUMANO

The news that former Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega will be released from his Miami prison Sept. 9 reminded me of the most important journalistic lesson I learned while covering his downfall in the late 1980s: When analyzing political events, never forget the human factor. Indeed, when we talk about world events, we in the media tend to assume that everything is motivated by ideological clashes. But, very often, events are triggered by religious revelations, personal hatreds or business clashes that have little to do with politics. Read the full column here, and let me know what YOU think.

Wednesday, January 24, 2007

FIVE THINGS LATIN AMERICA COULD LEARN FROM INDIA -- LAS LECCIONES DE LA INDIA

THIS IS MY LATEST REPORT FROM INDIA
NEW DELHI -- During my two-week visit to India, I asked several top officials the same question. Why is India growing at twice the rate of Latin America and lifting a larger percentage of its people out of poverty? The answers I got were amazingly candid, and on the mark. To find out the five main things Latin America could learn from India, read the full column here, and let us know what YOU think.

Tuesday, January 23, 2007

BANGALORE COULD BE A MODEL FOR LATIN AMERICA - EL MODELO DE BANGALORE

THIS IS MY LATEST REPORT FROM INDIA - MORE TO COME TOMORROW
BANGALORE, India -- This southern Indian city should become an obligatory visit for all Latin American leaders: its rapid transformation from an agricultural town into the world's hottest information technology center symbolizes all the good things this country is doing, and everything that many Latin American countries are failing to do. There are 1,850 information technology companies in the city of 5.5 million people, including the who's who of the world's top computer firms. To find out more, read the full column here, and let me know what YOU think.

Monday, January 22, 2007

INDIA TO PLAY A BIGGER ROLE IN LATIN AMERICA - INDIA JUGARA UN ROL IMPORTANTE EN LATINOAMERICA

THIS IS MY LATEST REPORT FROM INDIA. MORE TO COME TOMORROW
NEW DELHI -- When former Chilean President Ricardo Lagos told me once that I should pay more attention to India as an emerging big player in Latin America, I thought he was kidding: There is hardly a country geographically farther away from Latin America than this one.
But after several days interviewing senior Indian officials, I realized that the former Chilean president was right. To find out why, read the full column here, and let me know what YOU think.

Sunday, January 21, 2007

WILL INDIA BECOME A SUPERPOWER? --- SE CONVERTIRA INDIA EN UNA SUPERPOTENCIA?

THIS IS MY LATEST REPORT FROM INDIA. MORE TOMORROW.
NEW DELHI -- I came to India to see if this country of 1.1 billion people will soon become the next China -- a world superpower, rivaling the United States diplomatically and clobbering Latin America in global markets.
My first impression after a few hours here: It won't.But first impressions can be deceiving.To find out why, read the full column here, and let me know what YOU think.

Thursday, January 18, 2007

WHILE LATIN AMERICA NATIONALIZES, INDIA OPENS UP -- INDIA, CHINA Y AMERICA LATINA

Here is a preview of several upcoming columns from my two-week trip to India, which will be avaliable starting Sunday:
NEW DELHI -- How ironic! While Venezuela, Bolivia and other Latin American nations are announcing plans to nationalize key industries, the world's biggest developing countries -- China and India -- are reducing poverty at startling rates by doing exactly the opposite. China and India have been growing at the fastest pace and reducing poverty dramatically since they started opening their economies to the private sector, in 1978 and 1991, respectively. In an interview with India's Planning Minister Montek Singh Ahluwalia, I asked him what has India done to achieve such high growth rates. To find out what he said, and my reaction to it, read the full column here, and let us know what you think.

Tuesday, January 16, 2007

IN ONE INDIAN CAMPUS, CHAVEZ IS A BIG HIT - UN DEBATE SOBRE CHAVEZ EN LA INDIA

NEW DELHI -- I happened to be giving a talk at the Jawaharlal Nehru University here the day that Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez announced the nationalization of key industries. I thought the news would help me make the case that Chávez is destroying Venezuela's economy. How wrong I was! Far from applauding, the professors and students at the School of International Studies looked at me me with a mixture of anthropological curiosity and disbelief. It was obvious that, for most of them, Chávez was a hero. To read what they said, and what I think of it, read the full column here, and let me know what you think.

Monday, January 08, 2007

Greetings from India - Saludos desde la India

If you are wondering why I have not written any columns or blog items recently, it's not because I'm taking an open-ended vacation. It's because I am traveling in India, doing interviews for a series of columns and blog entries that will start next week.

The columns will try to answer some fascinating questions: Is India poised to become the next emerging world superpower, like China? Will it follow China's steps and play an increasingly important role in Latin America? Should Latin America follow China's model of exporting manufactured goods, or India's model of exporting services?

I arrived here last Thursday, and have so far interviewed India's Minister of Planning Montek Singh Ahlwalia, Minister of Science and Technology Kapil Subal, the deputy minister of foreign affairs in charge of Latin America, and half a dozen of pro and anti-free market academics. Tomorrow, I'll go to the university, and on Thursday I'm off to Bangalore. Stay tuned!

-- Andres Oppenheimer